Muslim Judicial Council South Africa – About Us

In the name of Allah, Most Beneficent, Most Merciful

 

1.     Headquarters

 
The Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) has its headquarters at Darul Arqam, 20 Cashel Avenue, Athlone

 
Says Allah, Most High in the Holy Quran:

 

“O you who believe! Obey Allah and obey the Messenger Muhammad (Pbuh) and those of you [Muslims] who are in authority. (And) if you differ in anything amongst yourselves, refer it to Allah and the Messenger, if you believe in Allah and in the Last Day. That is better and more suitable for final determination” (An Nisa: Q4: 59).

 

2.         Introduction

 
The Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) [MJC] is non-profit organization (NPO) or a faith-based organization (FBO), which was established in 1945. It is one of the oldest, most representative and most influential religious organizations in South Africa and enjoys local, national and international credibility.

 

Giving full credence to its vision of making the Muslim Judicial Council SA as

“A Home for All ‘Ulama” (Bay-tul-‘Ulama). The Muslim Judicial Council SA:

 

2.1       Strives to mobilize the potential material and human resources available to realize the ultimate religious and spiritual development of humankind.

2.2       Strives to establish and create the necessary infrastructure and sub-structures within an Islamic Ethos to realize its aims and objectives, as set out in its Constitution and contained in the Holy Quran and Sunnah.

2.3       Strives to protect and preserve the Din (Way of Life) of Islam in all its dimensions.

2.4       Strives to protect the Muslim identity and safeguard Muslims from religious, cultural, political and socio-economic exploitation, abuse, oppression and misrepresentation.

2.5       Strives to contribute positively in caring for and being concerned about the minority status of Muslims in this part of the world.

2.6       Strives to continuously protect and promote the pristine Islamic values and standards, especially the values and standards pertaining to marriage, families, children, women, the youth, the aged and the poor.

 

3.         Vision

 
To preserve and promote Islam as a practical, divine way of life, resulting in holistic approaches to all challenges and in all spheres of human activity. The Muslim Judicial Council (S.) is a “Home for All ‘Ulama” (Bay-tul-‘Ulama).

4.         Objectives        

 

4.1        To promote the value systems of Islam and to give guidance to the community, based on the Shari’ah of Islam in accordance with the Holy Quran, Sunnah, Ijmaa’ and Qiyaas, and with due reference to the Four Schools of Jurisprudence which are recognized by the Ahli Sunnah Wal Jama’ah.

 

4.2       To work for the fulfillment of the spiritual, educational, moral, cultural, political and economic needs and aspirations of the community.

 

4.3       To strive for unity of all Muslims.

 

4.4       To cooperate with all bodies and individuals or groups, without prejudice, provided the ethics and principles of the MJC will not be compromised.

 

4.5       To provide leadership, which will enhance stability, peace and harmony in the community.

 

5.          Identity

 

The Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) [MJC] is a Muslim Judiciary whose main functions relate to religious guidance, spiritual and moral rejuvenation, education, Fatawa (Religious Decrees), Da’wah (Islamic Outreach), Halaal Dietary Provisions and Certifier, marriage counseling services, socio-economic development and social cohesion. It is a Muslim Non-Governmental Organization (NGO) and a Faith-Based Organization (FBO), but essentially a Non-Profit Organization (NPO), in a country where Muslims are a minority group. The Muslim community comprises approximately 5% of the South African population of 47 million people. The organization adheres to the code of belief of the Ahli Sunnah Wal Jama’ah. It is the most representative and influential Muslim religious organization in the Western Cape, recognized locally, nationally and internationally for its religious, economic, socio-cultural, political, organizational and moral regeneration roles it plays in the Republic of South Africa and abroad.

 

6.     A Brief History

 

6.1   Founding Members of the MJC

 

As previously indicated, the MJC was established in Cape Town in 1945. Sixty-two (62) Founder members attended the MJC’s inaugural public meeting on the 10th February 1945 at the Cathedral Hall, Queen Victoria Road, Cape Town. Subsequently, an Executive Committee comprising nineteen (19) members was elected on the 17th February 1945. The Executive Committee comprised the following Sheikhs and Imams: Achmat Behardien, M. Shaakier Gamieldien, Igsaan Gamieldien, Abdullah Gamieldien, Ismail Edwards, Mogamat Salih (Abadie) Solomons, I. Moos, M. Tape Jassiem, M. Moos, M. Abbas Jassiem, I. Taliep, Abdullatief Parker (Imam Babu), Abdullah Behardien, Muawiyyah Sedick, Abdul Bassier, Sulayman Harris, Abduragman Salie, Armien Mustafa, Ariefdien Manuel. Br. Hashiem Edross was the General Secretary.

 

 

 

 

6.1.1   At the historical inaugural meeting a TEN-POINT PROGRAMME for the Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) was adopted, viz.:

 

6.1.2    To unite on the precept of the Holy Quran and to reinforce this unity by henceforth holding an Annual Conference of Muslim Religious Leaders.

 

6.1.3    To elect a Judicial Council from among the members to attend conferences, in which all religious matters could be referred for solution; such decisions of the Judicial Council shall be final and binding.

 

6.1.4    To elect a committee from among those serving on the Judicial Council or from those present at the Conference to investigate delinquency in all its forms and to make annual reports on the ways and means of counteracting same.

 

6.1.5    To register the so-formed Judicial Council in order to ensure its recognition by the Government.

 

6.1.6    To introduce a uniform and more methodical system of Islamic education in Muslim schools; members of the Judicial Council to supervise such education by, at least, annually inspecting the Muslim schools.

 

6.1.7    To support any movement, which aims at erecting a Muslim College where students will receive sound religious, as well as, a secular education.

 

6.1.8    To introduce an enlightened, methodical and uniform system of lectures.

 

6.1.9    To encourage and contribute towards the publishing of Islamic literature, such as literature to be approved by the Judicial Council.

 

6.1.10  To persuade the Government to recognize the abhorrence, which Muslims hold for exhumations and post-mortems.

 

6.1.11    To demand that the Government recognizes Muslim marriages as legal when performed in conformity with the laws of the Holy Quran.

 

 

6.2         Historically, the MJC has always represented the Muslim community and supported the struggle for liberation, but always retained its political independence, as an organization, by being politically non-party aligned. Many of its members were directly involved and participated in the struggle for liberation. Some of its members have served as Ministers and Members of Parliament (MP’s) in the government structures. One of its senior members, Sheikh Abdul Hamid Gabier, has served as the Ambassador to Saudi Arabia for the period 2003 to 2006. Noteworthy, is that the late Imam Abdullah Haroun who was killed in prison was also a prominent member and chairperson of the MJC. The legacy of the late Sheikh M. Nazeem Mohamed, a former president of the MJC, is well documented in the history of the MJC and in the hearts of the S.A rainbow nation. He was also a personal friend of Madiba Nelson Mandela, the first “black” President of South Africa. For more than 350 years members of the Muslim community were active participants in shaping a unique heritage and culture, especially in the Western Cape Province.

 

 

Out of an estimated 2.3 million Muslims throughout South Africa, about one million Muslims live in the Western Cape. Cape Muslims have been and continue to be an integral component of the socio-economic and political development and infrastructure of the City of Cape Town. Remarkably, the Muslim community’s limited infrastructure and [financial] resources were acquired through many decades of self-sacrifice and hard work. To-date, the Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) and more than 97% of the Masajid (Mosques) and Madrasas (afternoon Muslim Schools) throughout the country, especially the Western Cape have not received any International/Foreign Funding for developing and maintaining their respective infrastructures.

 

7.       MJC’s Premises

 

The Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) has its headquarters at Darul Arqam, 20 Cashel Avenue, Athlone, Cape Town. These premises, formerly an African church, were legally acquired in the 1970’s and officially occupied in 1984. Prior to this, the first official premises for meeting and other purposes were the Nurul Islam Mosque, Buitengracht Street, Cape Town, then the Rahmaniyah Primary School in District Six, thereafter the Azzavia Mosque in Walmer Estate, Cape Town and at the Muir Street Mosque, District Six. Thereafter, meetings were held at the MJC’s offices at Amelia House (currently known as Wembley House), Belgravia Road, Athlone. Some of the senior MJC members fondly told us:

 

“Minutes were kept in the boot of the Secretary’s car. We used to have meetings in the basement of the Masjid and there was no money for stationery or even to provide tea for the members attending the meetings.”

 

7.1       Inter-Organizational Relations

 

7.1.2     The current President [2008] of the Muslim Judicial Council (S.A), Maulana Ighsaan Hendricks, serves as the MJC’s official representative on the United ‘Ulama Council of South Africa (UUCSA). He is also the national President of the South African Haj and Umrah Council (SAHUC). The former President of the MJC, Sheikh Ebrahim Gabriels, currently serves as president of UUCSA. UUCSA represents all the mainstream Islamic organizations nationally; a forum which represents national unity for Muslim organizations and which debates and gives directives on religious issues and otherwise, concerning the national interests of Muslims.

 

7.1.3      The President of the Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) also represents the MJC on various International Forums, such as being an Executive member on the AL QUDS FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL, and a member of the INTERNATIONAL UNION OF MUSLIM SCHOLARS, established in 2004 and spearheaded by the Internationally renowned ‘Alim (Learned Scholar), Sheikh Yusuf Al Qaradawi, who is currently based in Qatr.

 

7.1.4      The Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) is also one of the founding members of the National Religious Leaders Forum (NRLF), duly established by the former President, Nelson Mandela, and which serves as a constituted forum for dialogue between government and the religious fraternity. The NRLF meets regularly with the President of our country, the Honorable Thabo Mbeki.

 

7.1.5       The Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) is furthermore actively involved in

various interfaith initiatives, like the NRASD (the National Religious Association for Social Development) and the Interfaith Commission on Crime and Violence in the Western Cape, spearheaded by Archbishop Ndungane, the Archbishop of Cape Town. The MJC has also joined hands with a very recent establishment, known as the Western Cape Religious Leaders Forum (WCRLF).

 

7.1.6       In addition to the aforesaid, the Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) has strong collaborative relationships and networking with various political initiatives or structures in the Western Cape and Nationally, whilst retaining its religious autonomy and being politically non-party aligned. The MJC has developed similar collaborative relationships and networking with various FBO’s and NGO’s through interfaith initiatives and relations, which are currently bedrock in the Western Cape.

 

To this end, the MJC fully supports the processes of peace, reconciliation, nation building, social capital, social development and social cohesion. The MJC believes that religion should play a pivotal role in South African society and endeavors to propagate Islamic values as a meaningful contribution towards nation-building and building a morally conscious and a spiritually rejuvenated society.

 

7.1.7  The MJC advocates and promotes proactively cooperation and dialogue with the ANC-led government and other Faith Based Organizations (FBO’s) concerning matters in the general and best interests of society.

 

7.1.8     The MJC, furthermore, serves primarily the Muslim community (+one million Muslims in the Western Cape) through a network of Masaajid. There are currently 160 Masaajid throughout the Western Cape. This provides the MJC with an enabling environment in its quest to address nation-building, social cohesion, social development, and the encouragement of social capital initiatives through processes of moral and spiritual regeneration; socio-economic development; cultural and educational upliftment of our rainbow nation.

 

7.1.9   The MJC is committed to the preservation of Islam, and to the development of Muslims in South Africa to become “Proudly South African”, whilst retaining their pristine Islamic identity. The MJC strives continuously to highlight Islam’s call for cooperation, sharing, caring, peace, equity and striving for excellence; and for the rejection of decadence, immorality, violence, corruption, unfairness, discrimination, racism, Xenophobia, bigotry, injustice, fanaticism, etc. thus lending credence to the Prophetic Teaching: Religion is Sound Advice.

 

7.1.10   Moreover, the MJC strives to remain committed and influential in its quest to assist in the alleviation and possible eradication of many horrendous consequences of contemporary socio-economic, ethnic and cultural problems, immoral and anti-social behaviour, and social ills, viz.: poverty, HIV/AIDS, unemployment, child and women abuse, prostitution, gambling, drug and alcohol abuse, crime, etc. In order to address these issues/problems constructively, the MJC has established various departments.

Two of these departments are the Department of Muslim Personal Law Services, better known as the Social Welfare Department and the MJC Halaal Trust, which caters for the dietary needs of the Muslims. As a mobilizing vehicle to address the social ills and sins, thus striving to create an “exemplary society”, the MJC has launched in 2006 the “40-Day Campaign”.

 

8.       Organizational Aims

 

8.1     To promote the value systems of Islam and give guidance to the community, based on the Shari’ah of Islam in accordance with the Holy Quran, Sunnah, Ijmaa’ (Legal Consensus) and Qiyaas (Analogical Deductions), and with due reference to the Four Sunni Schools of Islamic Jurisprudence, which are recognized by the Ahli Sunnah Wal Jama’ah.

8.2     To preserve and strengthen Islam through education and exhortation toward personal and spiritual development.

8.3     To promote the ideal of unity amongst all Muslims, specifically targeting the leadership amongst Muslims.

8.4     To encourage and work towards the diverse skills-development and leadership programmes for community enhancement and empowerment.

8.5     To provide religious guidance and consultation on socio-moral, cultural and economic issues, which affect Muslims and non-Muslims.

 

9.       Operational Methods

 

9.1    To supervise the administration and execute functions relating to the provision of essential services and religious affairs of the Muslim community in conjunction with various organizations and in accordance with the Quran and Sunnah based on the Four Sunni Schools of Islamic Jurisprudence.

 

9.2    To work in co-operation with other FBO’s, NGO’s, NPO’s and other organizations and/or groups of individuals with similar objectives, for the general upliftment of the community.

 

9.3    To establish and maintain links and working relationships (i.e. networking) with Muslim and Non-Muslim organizations, and institutions locally nationally and internationally, whilst retaining its Islamic Ethos.

 

9.4    To develop a business arm, based on Islamic Principles, Ethics and standards, for the purposes of self-sustainability and to sustain other projects and initiatives with similar objectives, which are also poised at development and growing the economy of the country.

 

10.     Membership

 

The membership of the Muslim Judicial Council (S.A) comprises of ‘Ulama (Theologians) and A’immah (Religious Leaders) of Mosques and Muslim organizations/institutions. Associate membership is extended to individuals, experts and institutions whom the MJC identifies as being able to contribute to its mission and objectives.

 

 

 

11.     Operating Structures

 

The MJC consists of three organs of administration to ensure organized execution of the general and departmental/project functions and duties of the organization, viz.:

 

11.1        The Imarah.

 

The Imarah comprises the most senior members of the MJC and serves as the conscience and custodians of the MJC, as well as, the Appeal Board of the Arbitration Committee. The President and his two Deputies also serve on the Imarah.

 

11.2      The Executive Committee.

 

The Executive Committee consists of the President, the two Deputy Presidents, the Treasurer, the Secretary-General, the Administrator, and five elected members. The EXCO is responsible for the general administration of the MJC and the implementation of decisions made at the General Majlis.

 

11.3         The Majlis.

 

It is the General Assembly of the MJC, which consists of all its members as stated under Membership. The membership is comprised of religious leaders and associated members, as determined by the Executive Committee.

This piece is taken from the website of the Muslim Judicial Council South Africa.

See on-line at: http://www.mjc.org.za/index.php/aboutus

11 thoughts on “Muslim Judicial Council South Africa – About Us

  1. Rafeeqah Cassiem

    As salaam… i have a situation where im currently studying in Wolwekloof just outside Ceres.The problem is the catering, its not halal , i have enquired about the status of the catering before i started.. no reply was given at the time.. i started in Wolwekloof on the 17th october 2010 i have explained to the caterer & the representative of the DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS & TRANSPORT …BUT To NO AVAIL…. i was told to accomadate them by eating from the kitchen or stay home untill this is resolved.. im done with the studies in mid December ……is there anyone that can explain to them ..why i may not eat from the kitchen kanalah …contact numbers 0232311862 or 0820444663

    Reply
  2. KRISH VENKETSAMY

    DB Wholesalers in Lenasia was approached for sweet hampers for the kids for the HCC Diwali Festival and the owners response was that they do not support any organisation if not Muslim? he was then asked if the Shop will be open on Sunday as Diwali is on Friday and again he said that he opens only for Eid…..Why then do we Hindus support DB Wholesalers?.

    THIS IS UNFAIR, WE ALL SUPPOSE TO BE ONE COMMUNITY.

    FROM:
    KRISH VENKETSAMY

    Reply
  3. Rasaraj Das

    I am a Hindu and I have a divorce proceeding against me by a Muslim Lawyer. He knows nothing about the Vaisnave way of life and my foolish wife trusts his legal cue. I am not aware of a single Muslim who consults a Hindu lawyer for divorce…Why?.

    Because Muslims have forced the South African Government to insititute the MJC.

    Now I want to sue him for ill advice and related Neglect using the ISKCON Children Protection Office. Muslims have their law and so do we. Enough is enough.

    Don’t we Hindus have the right to preserve and promote Vaisnavism as a practical, divine way of life, resulting in holistic approaches to all challenges and in all spheres of human activity too.

    Reply
  4. ADAM PARKER

    We are originally from Cape Town. We have lived in Perth, Western Australia for the passed 28 years.

    We would like to make a small monthly donation to some worthy cause in RSA.

    I wonder whether you can put me in touch with a lifelong friend who is (or my have retired recently) an official of the MJC who I would like to ask for some guidance on the matter.

    He is Imam Omar Slammang.

    Will you either ask him to contact me at E-Mail: adamhparker@bigpond,com or let me have his direct contact details, which I seem to have misplaced.

    Jazakallah

    ADAM PARKER

    Reply
  5. Dhaakirah Gasiep

    Inwoners van Hopefield sal vanaf ongeveer elf uur voormiddag op Saterdag, 19 Januarie 2013 Milad al-Nabi Herdenkings in die Hopefield Moskee in Skool Straat op die Platteland vier. Deelhebbers sal opnuut die geboortenis van die Heilige Profeet Muhammad (Milad al-Nabi, God se Rykste Seëninge en Geluk op hom), in gedagte bring.

    Die ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah sal ’n lesing van die Glorieryke Koran opvolg met die voorwerk en die Qadiriyyah poejies. Die voorwerk behels die uitvoering van sekere hoofstukke en spesifieke verse van die Onveranderde Koran, en ander Islamitiese gebede. Poejies is ‘kombuis’ Afrikaans vir sekere, of tipe adhkaar. Adhkaar is die meervoud van die Arabiese woord dhikr, wat ‘hulde’ bedoel.

    Plegtighede sal die Salaah (formele Moslem gebed), die dhikrullah (hulde aan God), en ’n kort toespraak deur Maulana Mogammad Rifaat Carolus insluit. Lekker kos sal bedien word. Een en almal is welkom.

    Geintereseerde persone kan met Haji Bienjamien Abrahams, adres, 10 6de Straat, Kensington 7405, Wes Kaap, huis telefoon nommer 021 5936585, of teen sellulêre telefoon nommer 0827728381, vir buskaartjies na Hopefield in aanraking kom.
    Vir verdere inligting, bel vir die Moskee Sekretaris, Badr Abrahams van 429 Skool Straat, Hopefield 7355, Wes Kaap, op sellulêre telefoon nommer 0737601587.
    Vir meer hier oor, kontak gerus vir die Moskee Voorsitter, Haji Abdul Alim Brenner van 492 Vlei Straat, Hopefield 7355, Wes Kaap, op sellulêre telefoon nommer 0729061770.
    Om meer hieroor te weet, bel asseblief vir die Moskee Trustee, Haji Mogammad Labieb Edross van 9 Coronation Laan, Woodstock 7925, Wes Kaap; huis telefoon 021 4487035, of op sellulêre telefoon nommer 0724518041.
    ’n Verdere kontak persoon is Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. Hy woon by 48 Tennyson Straat, Mandalay 7785, Wes Kaap; huis telefoon nommer 021 3872737, of sellulêre telefoon nommer 0799153206.

    Reply
  6. AbduRahmān al-Qādirī al-Athloni

    The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will assist in commemorating the Masjied ul Yunus in Heidelberg Milad al-Nabi Celebrations of Saturday, 25 January 2014.
    Heidelberg in the Southern Cape is after Swellendam and before Riversdale on the N2 motorway, and about 276 kilometres from Cape Town.
    Masjied ul Yunus in Heidelberg was first opened on Friday, 29 March 2013.
    Milad al-Nabi marks the birthday of the Chosen Prophet Muhammad (May the Peace and Blessings of God always be upon him). This festival is celebrated throughout the world and is a public holiday in most Arab countries.
    Everyone is invited to the festivities. Events will involve the formal Islamic prayer, the completion of an entire reading of the Glorious Qur’an and the Qadiriyyah dhikrullah. The ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Group will glorify God, pronounce His Oneness, utter His Greatness, praise Him and implore God for His Forgiveness, Protection and Paradise.
    A big tent will be installed to accommodate the large number of worshippers. Refreshments will be served.
    For bus tickets to Heidelberg, please ring Haji Bienjamien Abrahams at home telephone number (021) 593-6585, or at cellular telephone 0827728381. He lives at 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405, Western Cape.
    Another person to talk to is Haji Cassim Enoos Logday of 291 Main Road, Retreat 7945, Western Cape, home telephone number (021) 701-3220.
    For further information, please speak to Haji Siraj Logday, Pet Adventure, 27 Warrington Road, Kenilworth 7700, Western Cape; telephone (021) 671-1360 (business), (021) 839-7402 (home), cellular telephone number 0813056682.
    To know more about this occasion, please call Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. His address is 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785, Western Cape; home telephone number (021) 387-2737, cellular telephone 0799153206.
    A contact person is Sheikh Achmat Damon al-Qadiri al-Chishti of 6 Ladbrook Road, Kenwyn 7780, Western Cape; home telephone number (021) 761-9768, cellular telephone number 0828693982.

    Reply
  7. Haji Mogamat Ardiel Allie

    On Saturday, 24th January 2015, the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will celebrate Milad al-Nabi with worshippers at the Langebaan Mosque on the South African west coast.
    Milad al-Nabi marks the birthday of the honourable Prophet Muhammad (May the Peace and Blessings of God be upon him).
    Everyone is invited to the celebrations. Refreshments will be served to the large crowd that is expected. Events will involve the formal Islamic prayer, the completion of an entire reading of the Undeniable Qur’an and the Qadiriyyah dhikrullah.
    The Qadiriyyah dhikrullah is a set of litanies that is connected with the 11th-century Muslim sage, al-Sultan al-Awliya al-Ghawth al-’Adham Sayed ’Abd Al-Qadir al-Jilani.
    The Qadiriyyah Sufi Order was the first order of Islamic spirituality, taking its name from Sayed ’Abd Al-Qadir al-Jilani (May God Be Pleased with him).
    For bus tickets to the Langebaan Masjid, please telephone Haji Bienjamien Abrahams at home telephone number +27 (0)21 593-6585, or at cellular telephone +27 (0)827728381. His address is 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405, Western Cape, South Africa.
    To learn more about this occasion, please call the Langebaan Masjid secretary, Haji Mogamat Ardiel Allie of 11 Robben Street, Langebaan 7357, Western Cape, South Africa, at telephone number +27 (0)21 797-2805, or at cellular telephone number +27 (0)837143309.
    Interested persons may speak to Haji Mogammad Shawaal Nakidien of 66 Comet Road, Surrey Estate 7764, Western Cape, South Africa, at telephone +27 (0)21 633-5330, or at cellular telephone number +27 (0) 824056380.
    A contact person is Haji Mogamat Rafaat Saffodien of 17 Aalwyn Street, Langebaan 7357, Western Cape, South Africa, cellular telephone number +27 (0)768872354.
    For further information, please speak to Haji Raashied Conrad of 84 Schaap Road, Schaapkraal 7941, Western Cape, South Africa, at telephone +27 (0)21 704-5614 (office), or at cellular telephone +27 (0)832309365.
    Another person to talk to is Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. He stays at 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785, Western Cape, South Africa; home telephone number +27 (0)21 387-2737, or at cellular telephone number +27 (0)799153206.

    Reply
  8. Mogamat Faiz Isaacs

    Everyone is invited to the Milad al-Nabi Celebrations that will be held from after the Dhuhr Salah on Saturday 16th January 2016 at the Nizamia Masjid, corner of the Main Road and Keyser Road, Tokai.
    Activities will involve the Dhuhr Salah, the completion of an entire reading of the Holy Qur’an and the Qadiriyyah dhikrullah. The dhikr will be rendered by the ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah.
    Supper will be served just before the close.
    Interested persons may speak to Imam Mogamat Sedick of 17 Hood Road, Crawford 7780, at home telephone number: (021) 696-0417.
    A contact person is Haji Moinuddin Logday of Pets Aquaria, 291 Main Road, Tokai 7945, telephone: (021) 854-7748, or (021) 701-3220, cellular telephone number: 0848002286.
    To learn more about this occasion, please call Haji Cassim Enoos Logday of 291 Main Road, Retreat 7945, at home telephone number: (021) 701-3220.
    Another person to talk to is Haji Siraj Logday of Pet Adventure, 27 Warrington Road, Kenilworth 7700; business telephone number: (021) 671-1360, home telephone: (021) 839-7402, or at cellular telephone number: 0813056682.
    For more information, kindly speak to Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs. He lives at 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785; home telephone number: (021) 387-2737, or at cellular telephone number: 0799153206.

    Reply
  9. Mogamat Faiz Isaacs

    On Saturday 24 December 2016, the inspirational ’Ibaad-u-Ragmaan Qadiri Jamaa’ah will scatter adhkar afar by commemorating the birth of the Holy Prophet Muhammad at Masjid-us Saabiereen in Mossel Street, Mossel Bay.
    The Milad al-Nabi Celebrations will further honour the lofty status of the Holy Prophet Muhammad and express joy at his birth (May the Peace and Blessings of God be upon him).
    Events will involve the formal Islamic prayer, the completion of an entire reading of the Glorious Qur’an and the Qadiriyyah dhikrullah.
    One and all are welcome to attend.
    Buses will depart from Cape Town.
    Food and drink will be provided to the large crowd that is anticipated.
    To learn more about this occasion, please call Goolam Hoosain Mohidien of Tolbos Crescent, Mossel Bay 6500, at telephone (044) 693-4495, or at cellular telephone number 0824549444.
    For further information on the Mossel Bay mosque Milad al-Nabi observances, kindly speak to Aadil Muhammad Alexander of Kameeldoring Avenue, Hartenbos, Mossel Bay 6500, at cellular telephone number 0760821770.
    Anyone who wants to find out more about this event is asked to reach Hajja Fatima Brenner of 5 Mossel Street, D’Almeida, Mossel Bay 6500, at telephone number (044) 693-0105.
    Interested people may speak to Haji Mogamat Faiz Isaacs of 48 Tennyson Street, Mandalay 7785; home telephone number (021) 387-2737, or at cellular telephone number 0799153206.
    For bus tickets to the Mossel Bay mosque, please call Haji Bienjamien Abrahams at home telephone number (021) 593-6585, or at cellular telephone 0827728381. He lives at 10 6th Street, Kensington 7405.

    Reply

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