Crescent of Hope South Africa – The Magaliesburg Health Centre

THE MAGALIESBURG HEALTH CENTRE

A DIVISION OF

CRESCENT OF HOPE SOUTH AFRICA

INDEX:

THE MAGALIESBURG HEALTH CENTRE (MHC). 1

1. INTRODUCTION.. 2

2. HISTORY OF THE CENTRE. 2

3. PREAMBLE. 3

4. FOREWORD.. 3

5. CONTACT DETAILS. 3

6. MISSION STATEMENT. 4

7. PERIOD AND COST OF INTERNMENT. 4

8. OUR OBJECTIVES ARE. 4

9. VISION.. 5

10. TOWARDS THESE OBJECTIVES OUR TREATMENT PROCESS INCLUDES. 5

11. OBJECTIVES OF THE CENTRE. 6

12. LOCATION AND LOCALITY.. 6

13. REGISTRATION OF MAGALIESBURG AS A HEALTH CENTRE. 7

14. ORGANOGRAM… 7

15. STAFF. 8

16. CODE OF CONDUCT. 10

17. FEES AND APPLICATION FOR ZAKAAT. 10

18. MEDICAL AID.. 11

19. HOW TO HAVE A PATIENT ADMITTED.. 11

20. CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH PATIENTS ARE ADMITTED AND TREATED.. 11

21. WHAT TO EXPECT ON ARRIVAL. 12

22. WHAT TO BRING WITH.. 13

23. WHAT IS EXPECTED OF THE PATIENT. 13

24. AIMS OF THE TREATMENT. 13

25. NATURE OF TREATMENT. 14

26. DAILY PROGRAMME. 15

27. PROGRAMME. 16

28. RECREATION: 17

29. TYPICAL MENU.. 18

30. DISCHARGE BEFORE RELEASE DATE. 18

31. VISITATION.. 19

32. HELP AVAILABLE TO THE FAMILY

33. WHAT YOU CAN DO… 20

34. OTHER SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE CENTRE. 20

35. AFTER CARE CENTRES. 21

36. SUCCESS RATE AND INFLUENCE. 21

37. STATISTICS ON DRUGS. 22

38. STATISTICS CONCERNING MAGALIESBURG… 24

39. CONCLUSION.. 25

 

.

1. INTRODUCTION

It is only by the grace of the Almighty ALLAH that we have been granted the opportunity to offer our services to the Ummah (nation) during these trying times when there is desperate need to uplift and rehabilitate the community. We thank ALLAH for making it possible, through HIS mercy, to establish this centre under the auspices of CRESCENT OF HOPE and to use this centre as a means of comfort, understanding and consolation towards those who are victims of a harsh and influential society. We have been equipped to assist those who are afflicted by drug dependence, addiction, depression and/or the obsession for other substances. 

The approach we have adopted is similar to the SALUS programme of spiritual awakening, love, understanding and sincerity.  This concept is applied with respect for the individual, creative expression, mental stimulation and a physical exercise programme with a fundamental common constant viz. the recognition and acknowledgement of ALLAH.  May HE give us the strength and hikmaat (diplomacy) to be continuously successful in our effort to purge this scourge from our communities.

2. HISTORY OF THE CENTRE

 

The Magaliesburg Health Centre for drug rehabilitation was acquired by the Crescent of Hope Organisation in 1999 and covers 109, 7421 hectares.

Moosa Nagdee, one of our executive members, was assigned to oversee the development of the land and buildings and to make the place habitable this was done and the place developed into a perfect place for the treatment of those addicted. His tenure terminated on 28 February 2002.

On the 1st April 2002 Khalil Hassim was appointed as administrator / director of the institute as this was his passion and with 30 years experience in the field of counselling those addicted to drugs and other substances we were confident of success. He sacrificed a senior position and a substantial pension scheme from his company, Protea Chemicals, to dedicate his full attention to running MHC.  Never was a man more dedicated to his cause and to pleasing ALLAH.  Besides running the entire programme at the centre, he would travel all over to give the Jumma talks at various Masaajid on a regular basis, incorporating the topic of substance abuse in our communities.  He will fondly be remembered for his kind and understanding manner, his impassioned teaching, his quick smile and his ability to make a patient feel accepted. Khalil Hassim finally retired and passed away in April 2007.

After Khalil Hassim’s demise, Rafiq Mayet took over the reins. Rafiq is a progeny of Khalil Hassim. Trained, tutored and guided by him, Rafiq has become the administrator and counsellor of the centre and is proving his worth and making Khalil a proud mentor of this gifted man who overcame much to become an important figure in the recovery and recouping of our addicted compatriots.  

3. PREAMBLE

The task of maintaining and improving the institution and facilities available to the patients has been a challenging one as:

      The centre has been opened to serve the community and not for profit as the organisation governing the centre is a NON-PROFIT ORGANISATION ESTABLISHED ESPECIALLY TO SERVE THE COMMUNITY FOR THE PLEASURE OF ALLAH.

      The cost per patient has been kept to a minimum.

      We endeavour to make this centre affordable to the poor and needy.

We have over the years successfully created a secure and comfortable environment at the centre, where the main focus is the wellbeing and rehabilitation of the client. We make Shukr to ALLAH for guiding us in the right direction and ensuring that we serve HUMANITY for HIS pleasure only.

We also owe eternal gratitude to the members of the community who, over the years, have made countless sacrifices and contributions towards the development of the centre.  ALLAH has surely blessed our Ummah with great hearts. We pray that they be rewarded abundantly for their selfless charity and should always be remembered in our Duas (prayers).

4. FOREWORD

Magaliesburg Health Centre was established with the goal to serve humanity by offering relief and rehabilitation for those people that have found themselves trapped in the world of drugs and addiction and has a true desire to escape from this addiction. Our objective here is to firstly help a person to discontinue the use of whatever drug they may have become addicted to and supply them with the necessary skills to remain off drugs. We use the international 12–Step programme that most rehabilitation centres utilize worldwide. We have modified it to an Islamic concept. One of the first steps which are covered is to accept that recovery is only possible with the help of ALLAH (a higher power) thus the majority of our programmes and schedules (Amaals) help bring people closer to Him.

5. CONTACT DETAILS

The contact details at the centre

Telephone                    014 577 2171.

Fax                              014 577 2171.

Cell phone                   083 653 8788

Physical Address         Portion 21 Rietpoort 395JQ

Global Positioning        GPS Co-Ordinates  25°58’45.03″S  27°28’25.65″E

Postal address              P. O. Box 195 Vlakdrift 0342

e-mail                           mrmayet@hotmail.com

Website                        http://www.crescentofhope.co.za

The contact details at the head office

Telephone                    011 854 1809 / 011 852 7370.

Fax                              011 852 1509 / 086 661 3159

Cell phone                   083 786 4416

Physical Address        137 Rose Avenue, extension 2 Lenasia 1827

Postal address             P. O. Box 1635 Lenasia 1820

e-mail                          coh@mweb.co.za

Website                       www.crescentofhope.co.za

6. MISSION STATEMENT

The Magaliesburg Health Centre (MHC) is a substance abuse rehabilitation centre serving the Muslim Community of South Africa as well as the wider South African community. It is a faith-based organisation and Muslim religious practices are followed. Any male person of any faith will be welcome but will have to attend our programme. His religion and practices, however, will be respected. We are not admitting females to the centre but we hope to be able to accommodate them at another location soon INSHA ALLAH.

Our therapeutic intervention is based on professional values and proven research as well as a firm belief in the client’s right to self-determination. At present our interventions include the following:

      Multidisciplinary assessment and development of an individual recovery plan.

      Cognitive behavioural intervention.

      Person centred therapy both individually and in a small group setting.

      Factual information and classes about addiction and related topics.

      Life skill training.

      Family unification support and counselling.

      Aftercare services and liaison with rehabilitation centres in other towns to support clients from elsewhere.

      Follow up calls and research.

7. PERIOD AND COST OF INTERNMENT

The recommended period is eight (6) weeks i.e. 42 days. The cost for the entire period is R13 000, 00. This includes 3 meals a day, counselling, one-on-ones, accommodation, washing of clothes etc. It does not include cigarettes, cold drinks and other luxuries. These can be bought for the tuck shop run at the centre. It does not include medical cost (the doctor prescribing the medication must hand the medicine over to the counsellor for administering the required dosage) – if needed, visit to psychiatrist and other medical emergencies.

 It sometimes becomes inevitability to admit a patient for less than the required period. This can only be arranged with the administrator in conjunction with the counsellor if at all possible. The time period and the fees will be adjusted accordingly.

If a patient needs more time than the recommended period, the time period must be arranged with the administrator with the recommendation of the counsellor. The additional fees required will be charged on a pro rata basis.

There is a charge levied on the initial counselling session if the patient is not admitted.

Money paid for the period of internment is not refundable.

8. OUR OBJECTIVES ARE

      To offer a holistic programme that will provide clients with the best possible chance of long term recovery from drug addiction and dependence.

      To cater for clients mental, physical and spiritual needs

      To prepare the client for successful social integration when he leaves the centre

      To provide primary and secondary prevention services to the community.

9. VISION

      To develop and provide the most effective vehicle for long term recovery from substance abuse to the Muslim and other communities of South Africa.

      To assist, encourage and guide those prone to substance abuse to replace this weakness with positive thoughts and constructive action.

      To assist, encourage and guide the families to accept this weakness in a family member and to support him in his effort to overcome this failing.

10. TOWARDS THESE OBJECTIVES OUR TREATMENT PROCESS INCLUDES

      A multi disciplinary therapeutic team including social worker, nursing sister, counsellors and Imaam.

      Our clients often carry heavy emotional burdens and guilt.  We therefore offer personal counselling on a one on one basis to address emotional, social and psychological problems

      The multi disciplinary team takes part in the development of an individualised recovery and action plan with each client.

      Since our clients are often physically deteriorated, we do a full medical examination and monitoring.  This is combined with daily administration of vitamins to improve nerve growth, speed up detoxification, and repair the physical damage drugs have done to the body.

      Group interaction and counselling is lead on a daily basis by the Psychiatric nursing sister.  This encourages clients to have constant awareness of their emotional and physical status, and to share issues as they arise in stead of isolating the self.

      Life skills classes are run by the Social worker on various topics including:

Ø      Self acceptance and responsibility

Ø      Anger management

Ø      Realisation of harm and forgiveness

Ø      Communication for a successful marriage

Ø      Self appreciation

Ø      Brainstorming

Ø      Johari’s window assessments

Ø      Planning

Ø      Trigger identification and the relapse cycle

Ø      Relapse avoidance techniques

Ø      Life cycles and life stages

      For the spiritual wellbeing of clients our Imam runs daily madressa classes including reading and teaching of the Koran and practical Islamic studies.  Clients from any religion are welcome though, and their religious needs will be accommodated.

      Aftercare and support groups in Johannesburg, the east and west rand.

11. OBJECTIVES OF THE CENTRE

      To offer a holistic programme that will cater for the addicts mental, spiritual and physical needs.

      To prepare the addict for eventual social integration.

      To provide comprehensive primary and secondary prevention services.

      To redirect the lifestyle of the individual addict and to offer an aftercare support system.

      Treatment will be provided on a multi – disciplinary basis.

      The Occupational Therapist and Counsellor will conduct the “Twelve Steps” which is a recognized syllabus for the recovery of addicts.

      Detoxification and the monitoring of body weights is an ongoing process.

      The facilities at the Centre are swimming, tennis, soccer, cricket, indoor sports and a gym for exercise.

      Our daily programme includes one on one counselling, Peer Group Counselling, Spiritual Power Sessions, assignments and gardening.

12. LOCATION AND LOCALITY

GPS Co-Ordinates  S  25°58’45.03″    E  27°28’25.65″

The centre is located approximately 70 km from Johannesburg and is situated in the serene Magaliesburg area.  The peaceful natural environment compliments the work done here and removes the client from the temptations of the city to start his recovery. Boards will direct you to the centre from the time you leave Magaliesburg, on the Koster – Zeerust road, right up to the centre. Follow our signboards from approximately 3 kilometres after the turn off to Koster.

13. REGISTRATION OF MAGALIESBURG AS A HEALTH CENTRE

The centre is in the process of being registered with the department of health and welfare. The first inspection has been completed. We are awaiting the second inspection. We will get our centre number once the process of registration has been completed successfully.

14. ORGANOGRAM

 

      TRUSTEES AND EXECUTIVE MEMBERS

Ø      Mufti Yacoob Minty

Ø      Moulana Dr Ismail Vally

Ø      Hafez Yusuf Bhamjee

Ø      Hafez Ismail Kholvadia

Ø      Dr Ebrahim Chohan

Ø      Haroon Saley

Ø      Yusuf Lombard

Ø      Yusuf Suliman

Ø      Abdus Samad Kader

      DIRECTORS OF THE INSTITUTE

Ø      Hafez Ismail Kholvadia

Ø      Abdus Samad Kader

Ø      Moulana Dr Ismail Vally

Ø      Haroon Saley

Ø      Mohammed Rafiq Mayet

Ø      Yusuf Lombard

Ø      Dr Ebrahim Chohan

      MANAGING DIRECTOR

Ø      Mohammed Rafiq Mayet

      PROFESSIONAL DEPARTMENT

Ø      Two Counsellors

Ø      One Social worker

Ø      One Nurse

Ø      Doctor on call

Ø      Psychiatrist on call

Ø      One trainee counsellor

      ADMINISTRATION

Ø      Administrator

Ø      Cook

Ø      Ground staff

Ø      Cleaning staff

Ø      Handy man

Ø      Security

15. STAFF

      Centre manager and senior counsellor

Mr. Mayet has been with the centre for 4 years and was trained as counsellor by Mr. Khalil Hassem.  He left a lucrative position with KFC to dedicate his full attention to MHC.

Duties: 

Ø                  Day to day running of the centre and financial management

Ø                  Family counselling

Ø                  Personal counselling

Ø                  Madressa teaching and support of Imaam

      Nursing sister:

.           Duties:

Ø                  Medical examination and care of each patient

Ø                  Psychiatric evaluation of clients when necessary

Ø                  Leading group interaction and journal classes

Ø                  HIV and AIDS counselling, testing and education

Ø                  Health and dietary education including the physical effects of drugs

      Imam and Madressa Usthad

Duties:

Ø                  Learning and teaching Koran

Ø                  Madressa classes

Ø                  Practical Islamic studies

Ø                  Administration for the centre

Ø                  Anger management classes.

Ø                  Counselling

Social worker

Duties:

Ø                  Individual assessment and personal counselling

Ø                  Family counselling

Ø                  Life skills classes

Ø                  Ethics officer

Ø                  Development of therapeutic intervention plan

Ø                  Research and follow up

      Training counsellor

Duties:

Ø                  Twelve stop programme.

Ø                  Group counselling.

Ø                  Administration

Ø                  One on one counselling

      We have a Psychiatrist on call.

      We have a medical doctor on call.

      We are located near Laratong hospital.

      University students

University students studying Social Science are applying to do their internship at our centre. We received about 14 applications but could unfortunately accommodate only one. We might increase this number next year depending on the situation at the centre. The period of practical studies for the student is 6 months.


16. CODE OF CONDUCT

As in any other organisation or facility, we have a code of conduct and rules and regulations. The rules are created to firstly ensure the safety of all the patients, secondly to ensure religious ethos is adhered to, and lastly that government laws and regulations for a rehabilitation centre are met. When a person comes from a lifestyle of drugs and licentious behaviour, they are very often involved in criminal activities and uncouth conduct. During a patient’s first two weeks, and occasionally later in programme, he will very often test our limits and on occasion break several rules. The patient will then have to face the consequences. We try to instil in the person that for every wrong action there is a reaction or effect. Some examples of these consequences will be lock-ups, no cigarettes, privileges revoked, visitation and phone call denied, etc. For each transgression, we have an equivalent consequence. If a patient attempts to run away, we rely on the local police to apprehend the person. They will then hold the person in custody for two to three days before returning him to the centre. It is an unfortunate reality concerning any rehabilitation centre that there are people out there that will attempt to bring in drugs, run away to get drugs or to simply try to run away to escape their situation. To help prevent these situations we do have full time security personal on the premises (day and night). Restrictions are put in place and no patient is allowed to traverse at any time. 

17. FEES AND APPLICATION FOR ZAKAAT

A fee of R13 000, 00 is charged for six weeks at the centre. This process is discussed elsewhere in this document. The money is payable on the registration of the patient for admission to the centre and before he enters the centre.

The following procedure must be followed if a patient is poor and cannot afford the stipulated fees:

a)      The problem must first be discussed with the administrator of the centre.

b)      If approved, the patient must first pay an amount of at least half the fees on registration. The actual amount – but not below half the amount – will be agreed upon during the discussion with the administrator.

c)      An application for Zakaat assistance can be lodged with any organisation that the patient is familiar with.

d)     If the patient want to lodge the application with COHSA, he must first complete the form supplied by the administrator.

e)      Attach a letter from the Imam of his local (applicant’s) Masjid stating that you are Zakaatable. This letter must be on the letterhead of the Masjid or Jamaat.

f)       Submit the application to the administrator.

g)      THE PATIENT CAN ONLY BE ADMITTED AFTER THE ZAKAAT APPLICATION HAS BEEN APPROVED.

h)      The patient will be liable for the full amount if he is admitted before the Zakaat has been approved and the application has been turned down.


18. MEDICAL AID

Unfortunately we are not in a position to accept medical aid patient as yet.  We will be allowed to accept medical aid patients once we are registered and have received our practice number.

19. HOW TO HAVE A PATIENT ADMITTED

The following steps will give you a guide on how to have a patient that wants to help himself get off the drug that he is on admitted to the centre.

      First make sure that the patient wants to be rehabilitated. This will help in his recovery. It will not help him or anybody else if he is forced to be admitted to the institute.

      Phone the centre and make an appointment to have the initial interview and counselling session. The time stipulated must be adhered to and the patient must be accompanied by family members. Family members will also have to attend the initial interview.

      This counselling session can take up to two hours and will cost R250, 00. This fee will be waived if the patient is admitted or will be admitted at a later date. This session will be conducted at the centre in Magaliesburg.

      All parties concerned must agree to have the patient admitted.

      The full fee (R13 000, 00 for the six weeks) must be paid on admission. If the patient is Zakaatable, he must al least pay half the fee, and submit an application form.

      Remember the letter from the imam indicating whether the patient is Zakaatable or not. 

      The contact details are given above.

      Follow all other instruction given here.

20. CONDITIONS UNDER WHICH PATIENTS ARE ADMITTED AND TREATED

      A person may decide for himself that he needs treatment for his dependence.

      A family member, doctor, teacher, employer or the court may also refer the patient.

When a person comes to the centre, he is initially assessed to see if he is willing, ready and suitable to undergo treatment. He is also assessed to see if he is medically fit to undergo such treatment. This is normally brought by the patient from his medical practitioner. The treatment team also assesses each individual and his problems, and draws up a unique treatment programme to suit the individual’s needs.

We have two types of patients:

  1. Those admitted voluntarily for a period of 6 weeks or as agreed to by the team and the individual. This period is followed by a follow-up period at the aftercare centres.
  2. Those admitted for compulsory treatment (e.g. from the courts, doctor’s order etc.) are not tied down to any specific time period but the recommended 6 weeks still applies.

What must be remembered is that although the duration of the treatment may seem long, the drug dependant person has

      Over the years acquired a lifestyle centring on their addiction.

      May have already undergone treatment at some other institution.

      Has undergone some other type of treatment that has been unsuccessful.

      Has refused to admit that he has a problem.

      Or might still be recovering from the physical, mental, spiritual, financial and emotional damage his chosen lifestyle has caused him over the years.

Please remember that the staff at the institution has a tremendous task as all patients admitted is practiced con-artist and will try everything in his power to achieve his aim. His has out-smarted the people in the outside world and it is the institute job to turn him about and place him on the right path. He did not suddenly become an angel when he was admitted. Please keep this in mind when rumours abound about any drug rehabilitation centre.

21. WHAT TO EXPECT ON ARRIVAL

When a new patient arrives, a staff member will conduct a complete search of his belongings, luggage, and clothing and there will be a supervised body search. This has to be done, as we are dealing with some of the most intelligent and experienced people. On the rare occasions, something is brought into the centre without our knowledge. Due to this, urine drug test are given randomly to the patients. Complete searches of the premises are conducted by our security on a regular basis.

For a person to attend a drug rehabilitation centre is sometimes a new and scary experience.  If you decide to come to Magaliesburg Health Centre, you can expect the following:

      You will be assessed by either the counsellors or the social worker before being admitted.  We accept only willing clients, since an unwilling client only causes disruption and negatively impacts on the recovery of other patients.

      Before entering the centre itself you and your belongings will be thoroughly searched for drugs and weapons.  Neither is allowed in the centre under any circumstances and we reserve the right to confiscate and deliver to the SAPS any drugs or weapons found.

      A room will be assigned to you for the duration of your stay at the centre.

      You will, within the first day or two, be examined by the nursing sister and meet the rest of the patients and therapeutic team.

      Everybody must attend the daily programme.

      You will not be allowed to contact your family during the first two weeks of your stay. You will, however, be allowed one phone call a week after the initial period.

      They will be allowed to call you during the morning period only. 

      Visiting day is Sundays between 8 and 5.  Only family are allowed to visit. Visitors will be restricted to the visiting area and will be allowed into the inner quarters of the centre. 

      Duration of stay is 6 WEEKS (42 DAYS).  We do not allow the patient to leave the centre during this period, unless an extreme circumstance warrants a relaxation of this regulation. 

      Any patient wishing to leave our care against our suggestions will not be held against his will. We will, however, attempt to convince him to stay.

      A patient, who leaves the centre without the authorization of his therapeutic team, will not be allowed to come to the centre for a period of 6 months following his abscondment.

22. WHAT TO BRING WITH

The patient will have to bring the following item with them. They are responsible for belongings and the institute will not accept responsibility for the loss, theft or damage to anything belonging to the patients.

1.      A copy of the patient’s identity document

2.      Bedding for a single bed: blankets, eiderdowns, pillows and sheets.

3.      A mug.

4.      Toiletries: Shaving kit, toothbrush, deodorant, hairbrush, hand cream, soap, washing powder for their underwear and socks.

5.      2 bath size towels: please mark it.

6.      1 hand towel – please mark it.

7.      1 pair sandals: – please mark it.

8.      1 pair sand shoes – takkies: please mark it.

9.      Warm clothing for winter / casual clothing for summer.

10.  A track suit for gym: exercising.

11.  1 alarm clock.

12.  Qurtas and topes.

13.  All garments including socks must be labelled.

14.  A list of all items brought to the centre must be recorded and a copy handed in at the office on admission.

15.  Any medical check-up, medical prescription etc. should be taken care of before admission. The centre is not responsible for this.

16.  All patients will be required to carry our extra-curricular activities.

23. WHAT IS EXPECTED OF THE PATIENT

      The most crucial factor to the treatment of the patient is his own will to succeed and his co-operation. If this is lacking, the treatment will not be successful.

      That he should adhere to the rules and regulations of the centre. 

      He is expected to co-operate with the treatment team and other staff members and to become actively involved in his own rehabilitation.

24. AIMS OF THE TREATMENT

The main aim of the treatment is to help the patient to

      Understand both himself and the consequences of his problem.

      Realise that he can be treated and that he can live a normal life without alcohol and drugs.

      Get well again – physically, mentally emotionally and spiritually.

      Find alternatives to drugs and alcohol.

      Develop a lifestyle free from alcohol and drugs.

      Gain a renewed sense of his mown worth.

      Learn the value of a well-ordered life with good family and other relationships.

25. NATURE OF TREATMENT

It must be remembered that there is no easy way, no instant treatment and no miracle cure to rid the unfortunate victim of his dependency on drug or alcohol or any addiction he may be suffering from. Many people are under the impression that the sick patient can be treated like any other patient in the hospital, i.e. with pills and injections. This extremely ill client has to have a far greater treatment, besides the medical one, to rid him of this ailment. The treatment that he has to endure has to bring about an entire change in his life. Have you ever tried to change the seemingly unchangeable? Difficult and sometimes very nearly impossible to achieve.

This treatment must involve the patient frank discussions, family aid, family understanding, interviews, counselling and an opportunity to think about himself and his future. 

When a patient is admitted to the centre, the priority is to give attention to the way he copes (with assistance and a watchful eye) on his immediate physical needs. This will include his medical treatment, treatment of his withdrawal system and detoxification.

As soon as the patient’s condition permits, the counsellors will have an individual discussion with him to assess his problem. A group discussion with all the patients follows to discuss general problems relating to their addiction. In addition to the above we also form educational groups and discussions are conducted amongst on a regular basis.

A misconception People are quick to judge a situation before ascertaining whether the information (gossip?) they heard is correct – and if correct, why it was done.

The most common information, that spreads exceptionally fast, is that drugs are freely available at the centre. That the patients are getting drugs from the administration at the centre.

Firstly it must be remembered that when the addict comes to the centre, he has generally been on drugs for a number of years. Because of the lengthy time period, he most probably is on more drugs than when he started (e.g. he started using drugs once a day, then it went to twice or more times a day, then – because he does not get the “kick” anymore – he increases the dosage). The drugs he is taking, and the amount of drugs taken, is of such a nature that if it is stopped immediately, permanent physical and mental harm will be done to him. The taking of drugs cannot be stopped immediately. He is then referred to a medical practitioner who prescribes the quantity of drugs to be administered, how and when it should be administered and in what quantity and over what period it should be reduced. The prescribed drug and the instructions are then given to the centre. The nurse at the centre now has to administer the drug as instructed.

All the patient sees is that the person is getting drugs and notice that he is “high”. This information is then given to the visitors on visitor’s day and instead of approaching the administrator at the centre, they would rather spread this “juicy news”. The harm done to the centre and ultimately to the addict is considerable. PLEASE VERIFY INFORMATION COMING TO YOU REGARDING THE CENTRE BY CONTACTING THE HEAD OFFICE OR THE CENTRE ITSELF.

Please also remember that the patient has been on drugs for a long time. During that time he has become a very good conman and has learnt how to get drugs under any circumstance. Also remember that he will try his utmost to get drugs into the centre when he goes into a withdrawal or depression. That is human nature.  Unfortunately we find family members and friends “helping” him by providing these drugs. Although we take all precautions possible, although we have all security in place and although we preach the fact that it is for their own good, it will sometimes slip past us. This then is told to the outside world and NOT their friends, NOT their family, but the centre is blamed for this state of affairs.

26. DAILY PROGRAMME

FROM TO ACTIVITIES
Waking up time Adjusted according to the times for Fajr Prayers
Fajr Time Fajr Salaah (prayer) is performed
After Fajr Zikr and Ibadat or Tilaawat of the Quraan or Murahkabah is performed up to Ishraaq
Up to 7h30 Breakfast and vitamins. They now have a choice to either rest or sleep
7h30 8h00 Daily walk or cardio workout
8h00 9h00 One hour to rest, clean their rooms, make up the beds, shower and prepare for classes
09h00 09h30 Room check by security
09h30 10h30 Group interaction and journal class – First Session
10h30 10h40 10 minute break
10h40 11h45 Life skills class – Second Session
11h45 11h55 10 minute break and fruit served
11h55 13h00 12 step programme – Third Session
13h00 13h30 Zohr Prayers
13h30 14h00 Lunch
14h00 16h00 Free time up to Asr. Sport programme or gym exercises or resting. The patients are required to participate in sports such as cricket, soccer, volleyball, swimming or gym between fifteen hundred hours and Asr. The type of sport they partake in for the day depends on the weather and their decision. They have a choice of table tennis, pool or snooker if the weather is unfavourable. 
16h00 16h30 Asr prayers
16h30 Magrib Quraan reading, Individual Zikr etc. Between The patients have a Madressa class followed by a short break
Magrib Magrib Magrib prayer
After Magrib Read Surah Mulk, Surah Sigdah and Surah wakiyah and the reading of the Quraan.
    Supper
Magrib Esha Free time. The patients can now use the free time to complete any assignments given to them and to socialise with the other patients.
Esha Esha Esha Salaah
After Esha Durood or Madressa classes
After Durood 22h30 Free time. The patients now enjoy more free time during which the patients may play any sport (under supervision) or intermingle with other patients at the centre.
22h30 22h30 Lights out from Sunday to Thursday
22h30 23h00 Lights out Friday and Saturday
       

      Individual counselling takes place throughout the week on a roster basis. You will usually see your counsellor 4 to 6 times for personal counselling during your stay.

      There is a television for evening viewing outside of programme times.

      Failing to comply with the above will result in appropriate measures being taken.

      Total dedication and commitment must be given to achieve the full benefit of the above programme.

      Patients are allowed week-end entertainment

27. PROGRAMME

Our programme can be broken down into four categories:

i.                    12-Steps

ii.                  Life Skills

iii.                One on One counselling and

iv.                Daily Programmes (Amaals).

i. 12 STEPS

The twelve step programme is an internationally used programme designed to help the recovering drug addict find out who they are, come closer to ALLAAH  (a higher power) and start making amends for their past. It is one of the most successful programmes that rehabilitation centres have been using as already mentioned. We have altered the programme to cater for any belief that a person may have, especially for Muslims.

ii. LIFE SKILLS

 Life Skills cover a very large spectrum of daily activities that a person without an addiction problem may take for granted. Some examples of these are time management, dealing with stress, relationships, anger management and so on. There are two methods to convey these skills to the patients:

Ø      The classroom method (work groups)

Ø      Hands-on practical approach.

One of the most commonly found problems with a person suffering from addiction is their inability to deal with everyday events and problems.

iii. ONE ON ONES

One on Ones are the individual sessions that a patient will have with our counsellors. The team consist of Counsellors, Social Worker and a Psychologist. The aim of having these personalized sittings is to help the person with intimate problems they may be experiencing and to guide the patient through the programme. We have customized the programme to cater for the individual. We will be able to determine whether a person has a psychiatric problem that will need more specialised attention during this period. We will evaluate the situation if such a case should arise and, if we cannot accommodate the particular needs of the patient, will refer the patient to the either the psychiatrist or psychologist.

iv. DAILY PROGRAMMES

Our Daily Amaals (Programme) has been put together to help the recovering addict regain several attributes that they will need to survive in the world (good habits, routine, discipline). Although we have based the times around the Islamic Salaah times (catering for majority of patients we help), we do not enforce these times on persons of other beliefs. What we do encourage our non-Muslim patients to do during these times is to practise there own religions. After each Salaah, there is either a kitaab reading, Quraan reading or Zikr.

28. RECREATION:

      Swimming pool

      Gym centre.

      Indoor sport e.g. table tennis.

      Outdoor sport e.g. Volleyball, soccer, tennis etc.

      Horse riding.

      Trail walks.

      Other activities to help the patient overcome the craving for drugs.

29. TYPICAL MENU

DAY BREAKFAST LUNCH SUPPER
MONDAY TEA / COFFEE

+

EGGS / TOAST

KHARI KHICHRI

+

SIDE DISH

CHICKEN

+

STEAM VEGGIES

TUESDAY TEA / COFFEE

+

SOJEE PORIDGE

MUTTON CURRY

+

RICE

MUG & ROTI
WEDNESDAY TEA / COFFEE

+

EGGS / TOAST

DHAL & RICE

+

ALOO – FRY

BURGERS
THURSDAY TEA / COFFEE

+

JUNGLE OATS

MINCE CURRY

+

RICE

PASTA
FRIDAY TEA / COFFEE

+

KELLOGS

AKNI – SOUR MILK

+

SALAD

TOASTED CHEESA

+

BAKE BEANS

SATURDAY TEA / COFFEE DHAL & RICE FISH & CHIPS

OR

FISH BURGERS

SUNDAY TEA / COFFEE

+

MATABELLA

OPEN HOT DOGS

30. DISCHARGE BEFORE RELEASE DATE

The centre will not hold itself responsible for any person asking to be released from the centre before his due date (before 6 weeks have lapsed). We always recommend that a patient stay the full course as it has been designed to terminate after six weeks have lapsed. Asking to be released before this period has lapsed, means that the course could not have its desired effect.

The patient who is admitted for a shorter period has either been re-admitted because of a relapse or has made prior arrangement so that the counsellors could adjust the programme to suit their needs. This is only done under certain conditions.


31. VISITATION

Concerning visitors, the centre does not allow any visitors inside the precinct. We have provided facilities, a visitor’s section and meeting area, where the patient can enjoy a day with the family. Any packages and baggage brought to the centre will be thoroughly searched for undesirable items that are prohibited by management.

Parents can phone the centre at any time to make an appointment for them to visit their son or to speak to the counsellor. It just is not fair to rock up at the centre and expect the counsellor to leave everything and to attend to you. Please be considerate and phone a few days before time so that appropriate arrangements can be made.

Sunday are normally set aside for family visitation.

32. HELP AVAILABLE TO THE FAMILY

The patient is not the only person who needs assistance to stop this scourge. The family must be helped too. They will have to know how to deal with problems that may arise once the patients has been discharged. They will need to know and need help to cope with the situation. Their expectations may differ from that of the patient himself. The counsellor, who assisted the family when the patient was referred to the centre, will continue to do so for as long as the patient remains at the centre. If the family stays in contact with the centre, they can be assisted when the need arises. As a rule the patient’s family needs to be helped in the spheres:

      To develop an understanding of the condition of dependence on alcohol or /and drugs.

      To develop an understanding of the problems that has led to the patient’s dependence on the drug.

      To acknowledge and understand the problems that resulted from this dependency.

      To find ways to bridge the gap between family members, overcome the difficulties and solve these problems to the benefit of all concerned.

      To cope with the practical domestic problems that may arise, e.g. financial, physical, mental strain, emotional turmoil, family relationship and general attitude towards each other.

      To keep in touch with the centre and advice them of the patient’s progress.

      To assist the patient in re-adjusting to his drug-free lifestyle.

Relatives are encouraged to join groups, such as the After-Care Group. These groups’s aim is to help the dependent’s family and the protégé themselves.  It would also mean a great deal to them to meet others afflicted with the same “disease”. They now meet people who are suffering with the same affliction and understand their predicament. This in itself is a great help to the family and the ex-addicted person as they now know that there are others who can ease their pain and suffering through understanding and sympathy. Please refer to the section AFTER CARE CENTRES to see which centre is closest to you.

33. WHAT YOU CAN DO

Relatives and friends are the most important people in the life of the patient. They have the greatest influence in his life. Unfortunately the drugs and behaviour has impeded this relationship. Unpleasant things may have been said, or done, or implied by all concerned resulting in everybody becoming desperately unhappy and uncomfortable in each other’s company. This leads to a break in family relationship and friendship. Whatever the state of affairs, the rationale or the feeling, the patient (maybe all parties concerned) feels guilty, insecure and perhaps resentful. The family, on the other hand, may feel hurt, bewildered, angry and disappointed. Here are some hints on what you could do to help:

      ENCOURAGEMENT

It is trying for the patient to attend our centre and to remain drug-free. He may feel humiliated. He may be scared. It is up to the family to encourage him to do the right thing and attend a centre where he will receive help to overcome his addiction. At this point most of the decent friends have already left him and those that are with him most probably are doing the same things he does under the same conditions. Only his family can be relied on to rally to his aid. They have to convince him, encourage him, plead with him or/and threaten him to be admitted to the centre, co-operate with the treatment team and think positively about the future.

      UNDERSTANDING

We will help the patient understand himself and his problem(s) at the centre. Relatives and friends, however, also need to learn what dependency on drugs and alcohol means generally. They also need to learn what it means to the patient. Why people take to drugs and how they are introduced to this affliction. What drugs normally does to a person and what the drug that the family member is addicted to is doing to him. This you will find on the internet or in books or, now also available, on CD (DVD). They also show you what can be done to help the patient.

This knowledge will help the family to gain not only a better understanding of the patient, but also to formulate a clearer impression of the possible benefits of the treatment he will receive or have received.  Armed with this information, the family will now be in a position to support the patient to the benefit of all concerned.

34. OTHER SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE CENTRE

      Family counselling.

      Alcohol and drug awareness.

      Gambling addiction.

      Educational programmes,

      Information programmes for parents, teachers, pupils, students etc.

      General drug information to the community.

      Training for potential counsellors.

      Lifestyle education i.e. preventative educational programmes.

      After-care services.

      Out-patient facilities.

35. AFTER CARE CENTRES

1.      Springs: East Rand Counselling centre

Information regarding the after care for all addicts, counselling for the abused:

Person in charge:         Imraan Seedat.

Situated at:                  Selmont Mansions no. 6 Third Street, Springs CBD.

Telephone:                   Office hours 011-811-7766. / After hours 079-999-5-999

E-mail address:           cohsprings@vodamail.co.za

Days of operation:      Monday to Saturday

Times of operation:     08h30 to 13h00

2.   Johannesburg:

After care for all addicts are held at the Nana Memorial Hall on 65 Foyle Street Mayfair. The after care sessions are held on Wednesdays from 09h00 to 21h30. The session starts at 19h30. The person in charge of the centre is SHEREEN MOOLLA. She can be contacted at 011-830-0878.  There are three counsellors available every Wednesday evening.

3.      Lenasia:

Taalimul Islam Hall on Tuesdays at 20h00.

4.      Benoni:

We have been offered a premises to start an after care centre in Rynswood. We are still working on this to see how best it would suit the needs of the people concerned.

36. SUCCESS RATE AND INFLUENCE

Determining precise statistics for a success rate is extremely complicated, since clients move on with their lives. A recent international survey has revealed that the success rate of recovering addicts is extremely low.

In our case where we have had 468 clients in our care since 2000, we are recording a better rate. Even though we are only now starting a measurable research programme, we estimate that our long term (3 to 5 years) success rate is around 50 to 60%.  This estimate is based on the clients that we still have contact with, as well as the initial phase of our follow up research. 

Of the 434 clients who have come to us, we have had 67 returning after relapse.  This implies that even when people are unable to leave drugs the first time round, they still feel that we are best equipped to provide the help and support they need to try again.

We are attributing our success rate to the fact that we are applying a completely Islamic ethos in our effort to help our patients and that ALLAAH is rewarding the effort with these results. It is HIS mercy and compassion that the success can be attributed to – something the non-Muslim institutions do not have. We are proud to be serving HIM and his UMMAH.  It is a fact that if the patient continues with the Islamic programme of Salaah and Zikr in the outside world (as he has been trained during his stay with us), he will be successful as he has taken ALLAAH with him.


37. STATISTICS ON DRUGS

The Following information was derived from the MRC (Medical Research Council) South Africa newsletter “South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) – Drafted 25 April 2007.  Under the subheading Alcohol and Drug abuse trends: July-December 2006 (Phase 21). This document was drawn up by Charles Parry, Andreas Pluddemann and Arvin Bhana.

1.      Alcohol

Alcohol remains the dominant substance of abuse across all sites except Western Cape. Between 42% and Kwa Zulu Natal 72 % of patients in treatment has alcohol as a primary or secondary drug of abuse. 

2.      Cannabis / Mandrax – (methaqualone)

Across site between 29% (Central Region) and 45% (Mpumalanga) of patients attending specialist treatment centres had cannabis as the primary and secondary drug of abuse, compared between 2% (Mpumalanga) and 17% (Eastern Cape) for the cannabis / Mandrax (methaqualone)”white-pipe” combination.

3.      Cocaine

Treatment for cocaine related problems has shown an increase over the past few reporting periods in Gauteng, Kwa Zulu Natal and especially the Eastern Cape (among adults). Between 12% (Central Region & Western Cape) and 28% (Eastern Cape) of patients in treatment have cocaine as a primary or secondary drug abuse.

4.      Heroin

Over time, there has been a large increase in treatment demand for heroin as a primary drug of abuse in Western Cape, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Kwa Zulu Natal, but this appears to be on the increase in Gauteng and in Kwa Zulu Natal in the latest period.  Between 11% (Kwa Zulu Natal) and 23% (Mpumalanga) of patients have heroin as a primary drug of abuse. Most heroin is smoked but can also be injected.

5.      Club drugs and Methamphetamine

Treatment demand for Ecstasy, LSD or methamphetamine as a primary drug of abuse is low except in Cape Town. However 3% to 4% of patients had Ecstasy as a primary or secondary drug of abuse. A continued, increase in treatment demand for MA was noted in Cape Town in 2006. 

6.      Prescription drugs

The abuse of over–the-counter (OTC) and prescription medicines such as slimming tablets, analgesics, and benzodiazepines (e.g. diazepam and flunitrazipam) continues to be an issue across sites. Treatment demand as a primary or secondary drug of abuse was between 5% Western Cape, Eastern Cape, and Mpumalanga and 8% Central Region.

Inhalant/solvents use among young persons continues to be an issue across all sites, especially in the Northern Cape.

7.      Tik

Over half (52%) of patients in Western Cape now have MA as a primary or secondary drug of abuse with 56% reporting daily use. MA (aka-Tik) has now emerged as the main substance of abuse among the younger and older users in treatment in Cape Town.  Three – quarters (72%) of patients with MA as a primary or secondary drug of abuse (up from 65% – 66% in 2005). 72% were male and 90% were Coloured. Treatment demand related to MA use as primary or secondary drug was also noted in Eastern Cape (25), Gauteng (43), Central Region (15), Kwa Zulu Natal (3) and Mpumalanga (2).

8.      Khat

Inhalant / solvent use among persons continues to be an issue across sites, especially in Northern Cape. Methcathinone (CAT) use was noted in all site (263 patients overall). In GT 7% of patients had CAT as a primary or secondary drug of abuse up from 4 % in 2005. Use of Khat was also reported in several sites. Poly – substance abuse remains high, with between 30% Central Region and 48% Western Cape of patients indicating more than one substance of abuse.

PRIMARY DRUG ABUSE (%) FOR PATIENTS OF ALL AGES – SELECTED DRUGS FOR 2006.

  WESTERN CAPE KWA ZULU NATAL EASTERN CAPE GAUTENG MPUMA LANGA CENTRAL REGION
ALCOHOL 26 54 46 48 47 61
CANNABIS 11 19 19 22 34 21
METHAQ 3 1 8 1 0.4 1
COCAINE 5 11 28 11 5 6
HEROIN 10 9 2 10 10 2
METHAMP HETAMINE 42 0 3 0.2 0 0.5

 

A: Western Cape / B: Natal /C: Eastern Cape / D: Gauteng / E: Mpumalanga / F: Central Region

PRIMARY DRUG ABUSE (%) FOR PATIENTS UNDER 20 YEARS –SELECTED DRUGS-2006.

  WESTERN CAPE KWA ZULU NATAL EASTERN CAPE GAUTENG MPUMA LANGA CENTRAL REGION
ALCOHOL 3 31 18 12 16 20
CANNABIS 26 41 56 62 68 58
METHAQ 3 0.8 6 2 0 2
COCAINE 0.4 4 14 4 1 2
HEROIN 7 14 0 9 14 0
METHAMP HETAMINE 59 0 5 0.1 0 0
             

 

A: Western Cape / B: Natal /C: Eastern Cape / D: Gauteng / E: Mpumalanga / F: Central Region

38. STATISTICS CONCERNING MAGALIESBURG

More than 468 patients passed through our centre since it’s inception. Those that visited the centre more than once were only counted once.

      Drugs of choice of patients admitted to the centre:

Ø      More than 50% of the patients were crack cocaine dependent.

Ø Approximately 25% were dependent on Methcathinone or “CAT” (usually combined with Benzodiazepines such as Rohypnol, Blue beans, Green beans or Rivatril). This is the second most treated drug abuse, the first being Crack Cocaine.

Ø     The abuse of drugs like Heroin, Alcohol, Cocaine powder, Dagga and other habit forming drugs make up the balance – about 25%.    

      Recovery or success rate:

The following statistic is the result of a study conducted on 133 patients admitted to the centre from March 2007 to December 2007 and includes those coming for the second time after having a relapse.

Ø   Approximately 39 % of our patients admitted during 2007 are still “clean” up to date of publication of this booklet – June 2008

Ø      25% of the patients returned after a relapse and have since been clean.

Ø      36 % of clients have relapsed and may still be actively using their drugs of choice.

This indicates a success rate significantly higher than the international average of approximately 20% over a 6-12 month period.

39% +25% = 64%. (39% still clean + 25% clean after second admittance)

39. CONCLUSION

We live in this harsh and dangerous world. Many people have succumbed to the traps of drugs, alcohol and crime. It is a sad truth but no programme is perfect. There is no ‘quick fix’ for the people that we help. The international recovery statistic for heroin addicts alone is that 98% will not overcome their addiction. Only 2% of the world’s heroin addicts will one day find peace through recovery. Here at MHC, according to the last survey, out of 388 patients, 31 had a slip (used once but did not continue use) and 25 have gone back to habitual drug use. Regrettably, it is impossible to get a completely accurate success rate. It would be a dream comes true if you could give a guarantee that a person will never again use drugs, once they leave here but we cannot. All we can do is supply a person with the skills he will need and to help himself by increasing his faith in the ALMIGHTY. We help them remember what life was like before his addiction and give them the necessary proficiency to lead a normal drug free life. We can do all these things but eventually it will depend on the individual himself to make the treatment a success. Only he will be in a position to determine whether his life will be drugging free or not after the knowledge, he gained at the centre.   

We are currently in the process of building a rehabilitation centre for females. This centre will be built in De Deur. Please go back to HOME PAGE and click on DE DEUR REHAB CENTRE.

PLEASE CONTRIBUTE GENEROUSLY AS THE MORE WE COLLECT THE FASTER WE WILL BE ABLE TO BUILD THE CENTRE.

If you need help urgently or need to speak to a counsellor or would like to enforce your resolve, please join our support group in your area. Go back to HOME PAGE and click on SUPPORT GROUP and find out which one is nearest to you. 

AND ALLAH KNOWS BEST

  

32. HELP AVAILABLE TO THE FAMILY

The patient is not the only person who needs assistance to stop this scourge. The family must be helped too. They will have to know how to deal with problems that may arise once the patients has been discharged. They will need to know and need help to cope with the situation. Their expectations may differ from that of the patient himself. The counsellor, who assisted the family when the patient was referred to the centre, will continue to do so for as long as the patient remains at the centre. If the family stays in contact with the centre, they can be assisted when the need arises. As a rule the patient’s family needs to be helped in the spheres:

*      To develop an understanding of the condition of dependence on alcohol or /and drugs.

*      To develop an understanding of the problems that has led to the patient’s dependence on the drug.

*      To acknowledge and understand the problems that resulted from this dependency.

*      To find ways to bridge the gap between family members, overcome the difficulties and solve these problems to the benefit of all concerned.

*      To cope with the practical domestic problems that may arise, e.g. financial, physical, mental strain, emotional turmoil, family relationship and general attitude towards each other.

*      To keep in touch with the centre and advice them of the patient’s progress.

*      To assist the patient in re-adjusting to his drug-free lifestyle.

Relatives are encouraged to join groups, such as the After-Care Group. These groups’s aim is to help the dependent’s family and the protégé themselves.  It would also mean a great deal to them to meet others afflicted with the same “disease”. They now meet people who are suffering with the same affliction and understand their predicament. This in itself is a great help to the family and the ex-addicted person as they now know that there are others who can ease their pain and suffering through understanding and sympathy. Please refer to the section AFTER CARE CENTRES to see which centre is closest to you.


33. WHAT YOU CAN DO

 

Relatives and friends are the most important people in the life of the patient. They have the greatest influence in his life. Unfortunately the drugs and behaviour has impeded this relationship. Unpleasant things may have been said, or done, or implied by all concerned resulting in everybody becoming desperately unhappy and uncomfortable in each other’s company. This leads to a break in family relationship and friendship. Whatever the state of affairs, the rationale or the feeling, the patient (maybe all parties concerned) feels guilty, insecure and perhaps resentful. The family, on the other hand, may feel hurt, bewildered, angry and disappointed. Here are some hints on what you could do to help:

*      ENCOURAGEMENT

It is trying for the patient to attend our centre and to remain drug-free. He may feel humiliated. He may be scared. It is up to the family to encourage him to do the right thing and attend a centre where he will receive help to overcome his addiction. At this point most of the decent friends have already left him and those that are with him most probably are doing the same things he does under the same conditions. Only his family can be relied on to rally to his aid. They have to convince him, encourage him, plead with him or/and threaten him to be admitted to the centre, co-operate with the treatment team and think positively about the future.

*      UNDERSTANDING

We will help the patient understand himself and his problem(s) at the centre. Relatives and friends, however, also need to learn what dependency on drugs and alcohol means generally. They also need to learn what it means to the patient. Why people take to drugs and how they are introduced to this affliction. What drugs normally does to a person and what the drug that the family member is addicted to is doing to him. This you will find on the internet or in books or, now also available, on CD (DVD). They also show you what can be done to help the patient.

This knowledge will help the family to gain not only a better understanding of the patient, but also to formulate a clearer impression of the possible benefits of the treatment he will receive or have received.  Armed with this information, the family will now be in a position to support the patient to the benefit of all concerned.

 

34. OTHER SERVICES PROVIDED BY THE CENTRE

 

*      Family counselling.

*      Alcohol and drug awareness.

*      Gambling addiction.

*      Educational programmes,

*      Information programmes for parents, teachers, pupils, students etc.

*      General drug information to the community.

*      Training for potential counsellors.

*      Lifestyle education i.e. preventative educational programmes.

*      After-care services.

*      Out-patient facilities.


35. AFTER CARE CENTRES

 

1.      Springs: East Rand Counselling centre

Information regarding the after care for all addicts, counselling for the abused:

Person in charge:         Imraan Seedat.

Situated at:                  Selmont Mansions no. 6 Third Street, Springs CBD.

Telephone:                   Office hours 011-811-7766. / After hours 079-999-5-999

E-mail address:           cohsprings@vodamail.co.za

Days of operation:      Monday to Saturday

Times of operation:     08h30 to 13h00

2.   Johannesburg:

After care for all addicts are held at the Nana Memorial Hall on 65 Foyle Street Mayfair. The after care sessions are held on Wednesdays from 09h00 to 21h30. The session starts at 19h30. The person in charge of the centre is SHEREEN MOOLLA. She can be contacted at 011-830-0878.  There are three counsellors available every Wednesday evening.

3.      Lenasia:

Taalimul Islam Hall on Tuesdays at 20h00.

4.      Benoni:

We have been offered a premises to start an after care centre in Rynswood. We are still working on this to see how best it would suit the needs of the people concerned.

 

36. SUCCESS RATE AND INFLUENCE

 

Determining precise statistics for a success rate is extremely complicated, since clients move on with their lives. A recent international survey has revealed that the success rate of recovering addicts is extremely low.

In our case where we have had 468 clients in our care since 2000, we are recording a better rate. Even though we are only now starting a measurable research programme, we estimate that our long term (3 to 5 years) success rate is around 50 to 60%.  This estimate is based on the clients that we still have contact with, as well as the initial phase of our follow up research. 

Of the 434 clients who have come to us, we have had 67 returning after relapse.  This implies that even when people are unable to leave drugs the first time round, they still feel that we are best equipped to provide the help and support they need to try again.

We are attributing our success rate to the fact that we are applying a completely Islamic ethos in our effort to help our patients and that ALLAAH is rewarding the effort with these results. It is HIS mercy and compassion that the success can be attributed to – something the non-Muslim institutions do not have. We are proud to be serving HIM and his UMMAH.  It is a fact that if the patient continues with the Islamic programme of Salaah and Zikr in the outside world (as he has been trained during his stay with us), he will be successful as he has taken ALLAAH with him.

 


37. STATISTICS ON DRUGS

 

The Following information was derived from the MRC (Medical Research Council) South Africa newsletter “South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU) – Drafted 25 April 2007.  Under the subheading Alcohol and Drug abuse trends: July-December 2006 (Phase 21). This document was drawn up by Charles Parry, Andreas Pluddemann and Arvin Bhana.

1.      Alcohol

Alcohol remains the dominant substance of abuse across all sites except Western Cape. Between 42% and Kwa Zulu Natal 72 % of patients in treatment has alcohol as a primary or secondary drug of abuse. 

2.      Cannabis / Mandrax – (methaqualone)

Across site between 29% (Central Region) and 45% (Mpumalanga) of patients attending specialist treatment centres had cannabis as the primary and secondary drug of abuse, compared between 2% (Mpumalanga) and 17% (Eastern Cape) for the cannabis / Mandrax (methaqualone)”white-pipe” combination.

3.      Cocaine

Treatment for cocaine related problems has shown an increase over the past few reporting periods in Gauteng, Kwa Zulu Natal and especially the Eastern Cape (among adults). Between 12% (Central Region & Western Cape) and 28% (Eastern Cape) of patients in treatment have cocaine as a primary or secondary drug abuse.

4.      Heroin

Over time, there has been a large increase in treatment demand for heroin as a primary drug of abuse in Western Cape, Gauteng, Mpumalanga and Kwa Zulu Natal, but this appears to be on the increase in Gauteng and in Kwa Zulu Natal in the latest period.  Between 11% (Kwa Zulu Natal) and 23% (Mpumalanga) of patients have heroin as a primary drug of abuse. Most heroin is smoked but can also be injected.

5.      Club drugs and Methamphetamine

Treatment demand for Ecstasy, LSD or methamphetamine as a primary drug of abuse is low except in Cape Town. However 3% to 4% of patients had Ecstasy as a primary or secondary drug of abuse. A continued, increase in treatment demand for MA was noted in Cape Town in 2006. 

6.      Prescription drugs

The abuse of over–the-counter (OTC) and prescription medicines such as slimming tablets, analgesics, and benzodiazepines (e.g. diazepam and flunitrazipam) continues to be an issue across sites. Treatment demand as a primary or secondary drug of abuse was between 5% Western Cape, Eastern Cape, and Mpumalanga and 8% Central Region.

Inhalant/solvents use among young persons continues to be an issue across all sites, especially in the Northern Cape.

7.      Tik

Over half (52%) of patients in Western Cape now have MA as a primary or secondary drug of abuse with 56% reporting daily use. MA (aka-Tik) has now emerged as the main substance of abuse among the younger and older users in treatment in Cape Town.  Three – quarters (72%) of patients with MA as a primary or secondary drug of abuse (up from 65% – 66% in 2005). 72% were male and 90% were Coloured. Treatment demand related to MA use as primary or secondary drug was also noted in Eastern Cape (25), Gauteng (43), Central Region (15), Kwa Zulu Natal (3) and Mpumalanga (2).

8.      Khat

Inhalant / solvent use among persons continues to be an issue across sites, especially in Northern Cape. Methcathinone (CAT) use was noted in all site (263 patients overall). In GT 7% of patients had CAT as a primary or secondary drug of abuse up from 4 % in 2005. Use of Khat was also reported in several sites. Poly – substance abuse remains high, with between 30% Central Region and 48% Western Cape of patients indicating more than one substance of abuse.

PRIMARY DRUG ABUSE (%) FOR PATIENTS OF ALL AGES – SELECTED DRUGS FOR 2006.

 

 

WESTERN CAPE

KWA ZULU NATAL

EASTERN CAPE

GAUTENG

MPUMA LANGA

CENTRAL REGION

ALCOHOL

26

54

46

48

47

61

CANNABIS

11

19

19

22

34

21

METHAQ

3

1

8

1

0.4

1

COCAINE

5

11

28

11

5

6

HEROIN

10

9

2

10

10

2

METHAMP HETAMINE

42

0

3

0.2

0

0.5

A: Western Cape / B: Natal /C: Eastern Cape / D: Gauteng / E: Mpumalanga / F: Central Region

PRIMARY DRUG ABUSE (%) FOR PATIENTS UNDER 20 YEARS –SELECTED DRUGS-2006.

 

WESTERN CAPE

KWA ZULU NATAL

EASTERN CAPE

GAUTENG

MPUMA LANGA

CENTRAL REGION

ALCOHOL

3

31

18

12

16

20

CANNABIS

26

41

56

62

68

58

METHAQ

3

0.8

6

2

0

2

COCAINE

0.4

4

14

4

1

2

HEROIN

7

14

0

9

14

0

METHAMP HETAMINE

59

0

5

0.1

0

0

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A: Western Cape / B: Natal /C: Eastern Cape / D: Gauteng / E: Mpumalanga / F: Central Region

 

38. STATISTICS CONCERNING MAGALIESBURG

 

More than 468 patients passed through our centre since it’s inception. Those that visited the centre more than once were only counted once.

*      Drugs of choice of patients admitted to the centre:

Ø      More than 50% of the patients were crack cocaine dependent.

Ø Approximately 25% were dependent on Methcathinone or “CAT” (usually combined with Benzodiazepines such as Rohypnol, Blue beans, Green beans or Rivatril). This is the second most treated drug abuse, the first being Crack Cocaine.

Ø     The abuse of drugs like Heroin, Alcohol, Cocaine powder, Dagga and other habit forming drugs make up the balance – about 25%.    

*      Recovery or success rate:

The following statistic is the result of a study conducted on 133 patients admitted to the centre from March 2007 to December 2007 and includes those coming for the second time after having a relapse.

Ø   Approximately 39 % of our patients admitted during 2007 are still “clean” up to date of publication of this booklet – June 2008

Ø      25% of the patients returned after a relapse and have since been clean.

Ø      36 % of clients have relapsed and may still be actively using their drugs of choice.

This indicates a success rate significantly higher than the international average of approximately 20% over a 6-12 month period.

39% +25% = 64%. (39% still clean + 25% clean after second admittance)

 

39. CONCLUSION

We live in this harsh and dangerous world. Many people have succumbed to the traps of drugs, alcohol and crime. It is a sad truth but no programme is perfect. There is no ‘quick fix’ for the people that we help. The international recovery statistic for heroin addicts alone is that 98% will not overcome their addiction. Only 2% of the world’s heroin addicts will one day find peace through recovery. Here at MHC, according to the last survey, out of 388 patients, 31 had a slip (used once but did not continue use) and 25 have gone back to habitual drug use. Regrettably, it is impossible to get a completely accurate success rate. It would be a dream comes true if you could give a guarantee that a person will never again use drugs, once they leave here but we cannot. All we can do is supply a person with the skills he will need and to help himself by increasing his faith in the ALMIGHTY. We help them remember what life was like before his addiction and give them the necessary proficiency to lead a normal drug free life. We can do all these things but eventually it will depend on the individual himself to make the treatment a success. Only he will be in a position to determine whether his life will be drugging free or not after the knowledge, he gained at the centre.   

We are currently in the process of building a rehabilitation centre for females. This centre will be built in De Deur. Please go back to HOME PAGE and click on DE DEUR REHAB CENTRE.

PLEASE CONTRIBUTE GENEROUSLY AS THE MORE WE COLLECT THE FASTER WE WILL BE ABLE TO BUILD THE CENTRE.

If you need help urgently or need to speak to a counsellor or would like to enforce your resolve, please join our support group in your area. Go back to HOME PAGE and click on SUPPORT GROUP and find out which one is nearest to you. 

 

 

AND ALLAH KNOWS BEST

 This piece is taken from the website of Crescent of Hope South Africa.
See on-line at: http://www.crescentofhope.co.za/magaliesburg.htm

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4 Responses to “Crescent of Hope South Africa – The Magaliesburg Health Centre”

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